WAR and games...
  • Violence has been an issue in games for years and years and years. But, what most people don't realize is that game history was inter tangled with the history of World war from it's inception.

    The first games ever made were designed on machines made for service either stemming from World War 2 or directed in efforts based around the Cold War between the Soviets and the United Sates.



    As games get more and more realistic, especially in terms of simulated combat...it really does make you think.

    -Ray
  • This is from the Discovery series Rise of the Video Game
    Also, thanks for posting this with Dutch subtitles. :D
  • Wow! That's amazing how he took a military computer and made games on it. Thanks for enlightening me pocketmego.

    image Peace out, yow!
  • I didn't even noticed the dutch subtitels, I took them for granted but when I paused the video I saw them and I thought, WTF is going on :)

    Anyhow the video is very interesting indeed thanks for it Mego :)
  • As technology advances, games can be advanced. It just depends on what aspects of the game a developer decides to advance them in. I've played many war games, from Medal of Honor to Call of Duty 4, and I can tell you that none of them really capture the feeling of war.

    For example your men die and just disappear. I found this extremely strange because I would constantly see fellow Marines in Call of Duty 4 get killed, and yet no other Marine would go to help them. This creates no sense of danger, and really in war, you don't fight for mom, your country, or your flag. You fight for the man to your right and the man to your left. If there's no comradery, then there is nothing to fight for.

    War isn't fast paced. War is monotonous. In war, a soldier doesn't kill hundreds of enemies in one battle. You sit and wait in your fox hole, in your building, in your trench, or at your designated position, and you move when told. There's no mindless charge through hundreds and hundreds of enemies.

    Thus, war cannot be captured in a video game. I say this because if it could be, the player would not purchase the game, because to them, it would be boring and unfair. I mean, who'd want to play a game where you sit there trying to complete your incompetent battalion commander's objective, having no support, and being surrounding and hopeless until either you are told to move, enough enemies are dispatched that the enemy retreats or just dies,or you are told to fall back. Gamers would cry Fubar.
  • Ready2Rumble said:


    Thus, war cannot be captured in a video game. I say this because if it could be, the player would not purchase the game, because to them, it would be boring and unfair. I mean, who'd want to play a game where you sit there trying to complete your incompetent battalion commander's objective, having no support, and being surrounding and hopeless until either you are told to move, enough enemies are dispatched that the enemy retreats or just dies,or you are told to fall back. Gamers would cry Fubar.


    Of that, you are absolutely correct. However there has and will always be a direct correlation between War and Games.

    Technology advances for exactly 2 reasons.

    1. Better implements of War

    2. Personal recreation

    This is why simulated Military Training is referred to as Wargames.

    One of the most infamous stories of War and Games is of course the Battlezone Arcade Game conversion...









    -Ray

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