The Human Farm
  • Just a bit of philosophical fun.

    Read the text below.

    Original link http://board.freedomainradio.com/blogs/freedomain/archive/2010/04/16/the-story-of-your-enslavement-freedomain-radio.aspx


    This is the story of your enslavement; how it came to be, and you can finally be free.

    Like all animals, human beings want to dominate and exploit the resources around them.

    At first, we mostly hunted and fished and ate off the land - but then something magical and terrible happened to our minds.

    We became, alone among the animals, afraid of death, and of future loss.

    And this was the start of a great tragedy, and an even greater possibility...

    You see, when we became afraid of death, of injury, and imprisonment, we became controllable -- and so valuable -- in a way that no other resource could ever be.

    The greatest resource for any human being to control is not natural resources, or tools, or animals or land -- but other human beings.

    You can frighten an animal, because animals are afraid of pain in the moment, but you cannot frighten an animal with a loss of liberty, or with torture or imprisonment in the future, because animals have very little sense of tomorrow.

    You cannot threaten a cow with torture, or a sheep with death. You cannot swing a sword at a tree and scream at it to produce more fruit, or hold a burning torch to a field and demand more wheat.

    You cannot get more eggs by threatening a hen - but you can get a man to give you his eggs by threatening him.

    Human farming has been the most profitable -- and destructive -- occupation throughout history, and it is now reaching its destructive climax.

    Human society cannot be rationally understood until it is seen for what it is: a series of farms where human farmers own human livestock.

    Some people get confused because governments provide healthcare and water and education and roads, and thus imagine that there is some benevolence at work.

    Nothing could be further from reality.

    Farmers provide healthcare and irrigation and training to their livestock.

    Some people get confused because we are allowed certain liberties, and thus imagine that our government protects our freedoms.

    But farmers plant their crops a certain distance apart to increase their yields -- and will allow certain animals larger stalls or fields if it means they will produce more meat and milk.

    In your country, your tax farm, your farmer grants you certain freedoms not because he cares about your liberties, but because he wants to increase his profits.

    Are you beginning to see the nature of the cage you were born into?

    There have been four major phases of human farming.

    The first phase, in ancient Egypt, was direct and brutal human compulsion. Human bodies were controlled, but the creative productivity of the human mind remained outside the reach of the whip and the brand and the shackles. Slaves remained woefully underproductive, and required enormous resources to control.

    The second phase was the Roman model, wherein slaves were granted some capacity for freedom, ingenuity and creativity, which raised their productivity. This increased the wealth of Rome, and thus the tax income of the Roman government - and with this additional wealth, Rome became an empire, destroying the economic freedoms that fed its power, and collapsed.

    I'm sure that this does not seem entirely unfamiliar.

    After the collapse of Rome, the feudal model introduced the concept of livestock ownership and taxation. Instead of being directly owned, peasants farmed land that they could retain as long as they paid off the local warlords. This model broke down due to the continual subdivision of productive land, and was destroyed during the Enclosure movement, when land was consolidated, and hundreds of thousands of peasants were kicked off their ancestral lands, because new farming techniques made larger farms more productive with fewer people.

    The increased productivity of the late Middle Ages created the excess food required for the expansion of towns and cities, which in turn gave rise to the modern Democratic model of human ownership.

    As displaced peasants flooded into the cities, a huge stock of cheap human capital became available to the rising industrialists - and the ruling class of human farmers quickly realized that they could make more money by letting their livestock choose their own occupations.

    Under the Democratic model, direct slave ownership has been replaced by the Mafia model. The Mafia rarely owns businesses directly, but rather sends thugs around once a month to steal from the business "owners."

    You are now allowed to choose your own occupation, which raises your productivity - and thus the taxes you can pay to your masters.

    Your few freedoms are preserved because they are profitable to your owners.

    The great challenge of the Democratic model is that increases in wealth and freedom threaten the farmers. The ruling classes initially profit from a relatively free market in capital and labor, but as their livestock become more used to their freedoms and growing wealth, they begin to question why they need rulers at all.

    Ah well. Nobody ever said that human farming was easy.

    Keeping the tax livestock securely in the compounds of the ruling classes is a three phase process.

    The first is to indoctrinate the young through government "education." As the wealth of democratic countries grew, government schools were universally inflicted in order to control the thoughts and souls of the livestock.

    The second is to turn citizens against each other through the creation of dependent livestock.

    It is very difficult to rule human beings directly through force -- and where it can be achieved, it remains cripplingly underproductive, as can be seen in North Korea. Human beings do not breed well or produce efficiently in direct captivity.

    If human beings believe that they are free, then they will produce much more for their farmers. The best way to maintain this illusion of freedom is to put some of the livestock on the payroll of the farmer. Those cows that become dependent on the existing hierarchy will then attack any other cows who point out the violence, hypocrisy and immorality of human ownership.

    Freedom is slavery, and slavery is freedom.

    If you can get the cows to attack each other whenever anybody brings up the reality of their situation, then you don't have to spend nearly as much controlling them directly.

    Those cows who become dependent upon the stolen largess of the farmer will violently oppose any questioning of the virtue of human ownership -- and the intellectual and artistic classes, always and forever dependent upon the farmers -- will say, to anyone who demands freedom from ownership: "You will harm your fellow cows."

    The livestock are kept enclosed by shifting the moral responsibility for the destructiveness of a violent system to those who demand real freedom.

    The third phase is to invent continual external threats, so that the frightened livestock cling to the "protection" of the farmers.

    This system of human farming is now nearing its end.

    The terrible tragedy of the modern American system has occurred not in spite of, but because of past economic freedoms.

    The massive increases in American wealth throughout the 19th century resulted from economic freedom -- and it was this very increase in wealth that fed the size and power of the state.

    Whenever the livestock become exponentially more productive, you get a corresponding increase in the number of farmers and their dependents.

    The growth of the state is always proportional to the preceding economic freedoms.

    Economic freedoms create wealth, and the wealth attracts more thieves and political parasites, whose greed then destroys the economic freedoms.

    In other words, freedom metastasizes the cancer of the state.

    The government that starts off the smallest will always end up the largest.

    This is why there can be no viable and sustainable alternative to a truly free and peaceful society.

    A society without political rulers, without human ownership, without the violence of taxation and statism...

    To be truly free is both very easy, and very hard.

    We avoid the horror of our enslavement because it is painful to see it directly.

    We dance around the violence of our dying system because we fear the attacks of our fellow livestock.

    But we can only be kept in the cages we refuse to see.

    Wake up...

    To see the farm is to leave it.


    What are people's thoughts on this? Interesting? So what? Rather not think about it, now where are some games? Fuck you Flibble for wasting 5 minutes of my day? Shit, I have to get back to work before my boss catches me slacking off?

    How do we leave the farm? Do you even want to leave the farm?

    Can people ever truly be free? Do they really even want to be? Do you? Could you cope with nobody to lead you, and with 100% responsibility for your own actions, with no more politicians to blame?


    [CENTER]image[/CENTER]

    [CENTER]Morpheus says keep it civil. :)[/CENTER]
  • I don't want to leave the farm, because TRUE freedom is terrifying. Instead I want to be part of it, and profit personally off of another part of it and pretend I'm not a piece of it as well, if that makes sense.

    True freedom...I don't know if anyone is ready for it. We've been babied and pulled into this situation we are in. You can think away from the farm, but to actually leave it means, in a way, to be under attack from it in a way.

    So say I shed everything. I go into a remote area. I'm subject to the laws of man. Something I can never truly leave, with the population and culture being as big as it is. "Man found in remote area, eats police who tried to put clothes on him" isn't a good headline. We know this isn't about being wild and free like that, necessarily, but you get what I mean, yes?

    It's too late for nearly all of us. Suck it up, make the best of it, and be on top of it. Maybe the farm IS true freedom - if you're in control. But it's always ignorance...who is truly in control? We enslave each other.

    Sorry for the rambling post.
  • Humans are a social species so you're always going to have a farm because no one really wants to leave when you have all these perks of civilization. The good news is is that (at least to me) we have been slowly creeping to better systems over the course of human existence...mainly because now we have such freedom of information. Of course, certain farmers don't like, and they might be able to control it for awhile but in the end unless we are thrown back into the Dark Ages from war or something else catastrophic, they basically are powerless to stop the slow march to another type of farm that will be better for its stock than the last.
  • Having no farm and/or "total" freedom would be a chaotic existence. The idea of the society is collective good.

    I also disagree with the strictly philosphical attibution to death. A hen doesn't fear death quite like we do because of cognitive abilities, however, if you choke a chicken, it will squirm around, because there's a biological "fight or flight" response that basically all animals have. Survival is ingrained in all animals, even in viruses, parasites, etc. We just have a seperate view of death. Even then, we're learning more and more that other animals are smarter than we originally perceived. Some new, theoretical research is looking into the possibility of dolphins having a "human-like" language in how it is used.

    Anyways, that's not the crux of this. All of this said, we're still a long ways away from a work-free society and a resource constrained society, which as far as I can see is the best step. I think one day there will be some sort of post-scarcity environemnt. Right now, there really isn't much choice on the job you have, how you work, how you live, etc. Technology and greater social development will eventually create a world in which resources are more abundant and that "work to live" just becomes "work if you want" or else do whatever. That would be the biggest breakoff from the human farm yet.

    Infact, technically speaking, we're actually pretty capable of providing food to the whole planet if we had the means to distribute it. That's the first step.

    We are getting there slowly. The modern democratic state is still a much "flater" society than the royalty of old, where one man held most of the power. At least now it's distributed among hundreds of people.
  • GoodEnoughForMe said:
    I also disagree with the strictly philosphical attibution to death. A hen doesn't fear death quite like we do because of cognitive abilities, however, if you choke a chicken, it will squirm around, because there's a biological "fight or flight" response that basically all animals have. Survival is ingrained in all animals, even in viruses, parasites, etc. We just have a seperate view of death. Even then, we're learning more and more that other animals are smarter than we originally perceived. Some new, theoretical research is looking into the possibility of dolhpins having a "human-like" language in how it is used.


    image
  • Sunflower said:
    I don't want to leave the farm, because TRUE freedom is terrifying. Instead I want to be part of it, and profit personally off of another part of it and pretend I'm not a piece of it as well, if that makes sense.

    True freedom...I don't know if anyone is ready for it. We've been babied and pulled into this situation we are in. You can think away from the farm, but to actually leave it means, in a way, to be under attack from it in a way.

    So say I shed everything. I go into a remote area. I'm subject to the laws of man. Something I can never truly leave, with the population and culture being as big as it is. "Man found in remote area, eats police who tried to put clothes on him" isn't a good headline. We know this isn't about being wild and free like that, necessarily, but you get what I mean, yes?

    It's too late for nearly all of us. Suck it up, make the best of it, and be on top of it. Maybe the farm IS true freedom - if you're in control. But it's always ignorance...who is truly in control? We enslave each other.

    Sorry for the rambling post.

    i wouldnt call that rambling, its very close to what i was thinking.
  • GoodEnoughForMe said:
    I also disagree with the strictly philosphical attibution to death. A hen doesn't fear death quite like we do because of cognitive abilities, however, if you choke a chicken, it will squirm around, because there's a biological "fight or flight" response that basically all animals have.

    Infact, technically speaking, we're actually pretty capable of providing food to the whole planet if we had the means to distribute it. That's the first step.

    We are getting there slowly. The modern democratic state is still a much "flater" society than the royalty of old, where one man held most of the power. At least now it's distributed among hundreds of people.


    But that's exactly what he said about the chicken. It lives in the moment. If you tell the chicken to lay 50 eggs by Thursday or it dies will you see an increase in produce? Of course not. He also states quite explicitly that the reason is our cognition, where he says the day we came to fear death was the day we became slaves. Think about it, what is religion? It's spending your whole life preparing for your death to some people, leading a righteous life in the hope of being rewarded in the next. I don't think Basil the rooster is spending his days wondering about whether he will go to Chicken Heaven or Kentucky Fried Hell after he kicks the bucket.

    As for point 2, everything I've read seems to contradict that, unless you are talking of genetically modified seeds (which come with a whole banquet of other issues), or disregard the quality of the food. There're also those that believe to produce enough food to feed everyone we'd have to damage the environment considerably. I'm no expert obviously, but that's what I've read.

    The royalty of old also divided their power though. The nobles were given land to rule as they saw fit, so long as they kept tribute pouring in. It's also as the article said: to control the cows some cows are put on the payroll of the farmers.

    I've read the articles about the dolphins. Maybe Douglas Adams was right after all? :)

    Anyway it's an interesting article, but like most articles of it's kind, it stops short of offering any alternative besides "why can't we all just get along?" I just thought it would be a fun topic to shoot the shit with.

    Sunny, I think your opening statement pretty much sums it up for 99% of people. They recognise they can't live without the farm so resign themselves to it, and furthering their own climb up its ladder. But having said that, what does that ultimately say about humans? Can we really bang on about virtue, morality, and waging wars in the name of freedom when we are what we are? Doesn't it make the true motivations for the liberty wars even more transparent? Also, that wasn't a ramble. It's probably one of the longest posts I've ever seen from you, but it wasn't a ramble. :p
  • The piece is a little harsh on animals, who we don't truly understand enough to make the claims this piece does.

    To be honest, f__k yes I want to 'leave the farm', but I'm terrified that I wouldn't be able to provide for my family if I was off the grid, and I do like my creature comforts.

    I've always felt oppressed by our current system, and somehow guilty or greedy because I feel this way, because society does many great things. I'd prefer to live my life at a more leisurely pace. This doesn't mean I'm lazy - far from it - but I need downtime.

    The funny thing about humans is that we settle near the best agricultural lands, and end up building houses over them. Imagine how much food could be created today if we had had the foresight to say that areas designated the best agricultural land must be zoned for food production? The bottom line is it is hard to live off the grid in Australia and still have arable land.

    A lot of the creature comforts I enjoy can be made at home... but the component parts with which they can be made still need to be purchased or (if very lucky) bartered for.

    In short I'll never leave. Health care is one thing that is impossible to reproduce at home.

    CRC
  • Dr Flibble said:
    I've read the articles about the dolphins. Maybe Douglas Adams was right after all? :)


    I've always thought so.

    First of all, great topic, and thanks for posting this.

    Governments take all their power with the consent of the governed. Without this consent a state of revolution exists.

    That said, we live in a society where dissent is tolerated so long as it's peaceful for the most part. Without it we'd have violent revolution.

    That said, I agree that we put ourselves here. We consent to whatever our governments are doing, because we leave them in power.

    I'd go so far as to argue that 99% of people living in First World situations can't live in a world outside the farm. Those people that can are already doing so in the anarchic areas of Asia, Africa, and South America. I would even argue that people in remote areas of the States or Canada are doing better in that respect. Rappers call it 'hustlin'.' Making money, making scratch, getting by. But still, there are those of us who think we could do it.

    All right.

    Remember that zompocalypse plan? You know, the one where you hole up somewhere, society crumbles around you and you have to build 10' walls? The one where God gave you a gun, trigger finger and ammo and the will to survive?

    No?

    How about reading up on the middle ages. The Roman Empire pulls out and suddenly there's a power vacuum. What happens? Complete lawlessness. Bands of people roaming the countryside, armed to the teeth, ready to roll anyone that looks half-decently valuable. Kidnappings for ransom. Burning of villiages and genocides. Warlords running little more than gangs. Independent towns with private armies where bughers and merchants call the shots in their own little human farms. God help the independent farmer who had nothing but the fields at his disposal. He had to find people to band with to provide him and his land protection. More often than not, this meant the warlords.

    In my opinion, that sounds rather like modern Africa, or Afghanistan.

    Would I leave the farm? Fuck, no. Like I said in that other political thread, I'd happily give of my own money and resources to give me a relatively secure, and reasonably happy place to live in relative peace. The farm is what my one friend from Iran once said was 'paradise.' She told me we don't have any idea how good we have it. I think she's right.

    That isn't to say I haven't always dreamed of living on my own farm and being 'off the grid', raising my own food and livestock and generating my own power and having my own well.... But that doesn't mean I'd swear off the army or police force that keep the peace or the health care system that saves my ass when I'm dying. And it's a HELL of a lot of work I really don't want to do, in the end.

    In my opinion, people who bitch about the government that aren't participating in council meetings, that aren't writing letters and getting involved, have no business bitching. Democracy is a participatory process. So, participate :D
  • Dr Flibble said:
    But that's exactly what he said about the chicken. It lives in the moment. If you tell the chicken to lay 50 eggs by Thursday or it dies will you see an increase in produce? Of course not. He also states quite explicitly that the reason is our cognition, where he says the day we came to fear death was the day we became slaves. Think about it, what is religion? It's spending your whole life preparing for your death to some people, leading a righteous life in the hope of being rewarded in the next. I don't think Basil the rooster is spending his days wondering about whether he will go to Chicken Heaven or Kentucky Fried Hell after he kicks the bucket.

    As for point 2, everything I've read seems to contradict that, unless you are talking of genetically modified seeds (which come with a whole banquet of other issues), or disregard the quality of the food. There're also those that believe to produce enough food to feed everyone we'd have to damage the environment considerably. I'm no expert obviously, but that's what I've read.

    The royalty of old also divided their power though. The nobles were given land to rule as they saw fit, so long as they kept tribute pouring in. It's also as the article said: to control the cows some cows are put on the payroll of the farmers.

    I've read the articles about the dolphins. Maybe Douglas Adams was right after all? :)

    Anyway it's an interesting article, but like most articles of it's kind, it stops short of offering any alternative besides "why can't we all just get along?" I just thought it would be a fun topic to shoot the shit with.

    Sunny, I think your opening statement pretty much sums it up for 99% of people. They recognise they can't live without the farm so resign themselves to it, and furthering their own climb up its ladder. But having said that, what does that ultimately say about humans? Can we really bang on about virtue, morality, and waging wars in the name of freedom when we are what we are? Doesn't it make the true motivations for the liberty wars even more transparent? Also, that wasn't a ramble. It's probably one of the longest posts I've ever seen from you, but it wasn't a ramble. :p


    Hmm, I took it more as of a piece on how chickens don't understand and don't seek to... escape? Obviously you can't bribe them with death, but I'm not sure why the article suggests that that is a bad human quality. It's like the author has this idea that what makes us different makes us wrong. If humans didn't respect death and violence like we do now, and took a more "animalistic" approach to it, oh boy. Batten down the hatches.

    That's sort of the point of "the farm." It's a collective good system that ensures a sort of order and "normalcy." Ever since early man, the chances of dying from war or crime or hunger has decreased. This is why I feel like the original writer has excused evidence to make some vain philosophical point. Of course society isn't perfect, the farm isn't perfect, it never has been. But, it has always been improving, and it does ensure this is not a total predatory society in which might makes right, like it often does amongst other animals.

    The food is tricky but we have a wealth of technology. We can grow plants without soil. GM crops can be safe as long as we guard against virus or parasite strains, but they don't have any different effect on those who consume them. The western world alone throws away enough food a year to feed many countries over. The problem is the areas it needs to go. Countries lack the safety measures and infrastructure measures to distribute it. Plus, there's issues of clean water, health care, education, and other areas to be tackled.

    And yeah, America's democracy is a sort of republic quasi-oligarchy, but it's still preferable to whatever farm we had back in the day. Even with the control still used, I can go outside and say "fuck the president" than burn a Bible and go on a forum and rant explicitly about my sex life. 500 years ago I would be dead.
  • GoodEnoughForMe said:
    The food is tricky but we have a wealth of technology. We can grow plants without soil. GM crops can be safe as long as we guard against virus or parasite strains, but they don't have any different effect on those who consume them.


    I could start another thread about this topic if people are interested. I have some BIG issues with GM crops. :p

    As for the farm, I agree it's kind of inevitable. The alternative would be chaos. It's a bit like Communism; the greatest flaw with Communism is that it assumes humans are not complete twats. I think the author of this article has hit the same snag. The idea of complete freedom, no oppression, and playful chickens frollicking carefree in the fields is a nice one, but totally incapable of surviving real contact with reality. And since the author himself states truly free societies attract those that want to exploit and oppress it, he's basically saying they're doomed to begin with anyway.
  • So what is utopia?

    Ideas of utopia have been around for centuries, but we don't seem to discuss what a perfect society would look like anymore.

    What is your perfect society?

    CRC
  • i think he missed a step complacency, you see it in all progressed civilized nations, you don't need dictators, you need comfort. people have all they need, have their TV with brainless show, the sport events. As long as they have that they will let the government eat away their liberties, where is the activism of the 60's and 70's? as long as the people have their bread and play, they don't care.
  • CapnRedChops said:
    So what is utopia?

    What is your perfect society?


    I haven't really thought about it to be honest. I guess off the top of my head a society that understands the concept of doing things in moderation would be nice. I'll have to think about it some more, but I'm pretty sure cricket and schoolgirls, lots of schoolgirls, will be on my list. :)

    How about you?
  • Dr Flibble said:
    I haven't really thought about it to be honest. I guess off the top of my head a society that understands the concept of doing things in moderation would be nice. I'll have to think about it some more, but I'm pretty sure cricket and schoolgirls, lots of schoolgirls, will be on my list. :)

    How about you?


    Your utopia differs from mine.

    Gross excess of everything, provided it doesn't encroach on others' desires.

    Shit, that's America. I am in utopia.
  • Sunflower said:
    Your utopia differs from mine.

    Gross excess of everything, provided it doesn't encroach on others' desires.

    Shit, that's America. I am in utopia.


    Wait a minute...so this is your utopia?

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    Yeah, I think I'll not have that second helping of excess. :p
  • That's THEIR utopia!
  • Fat bitches aside I would leave the farm. I am a wandering soul.

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