Rate the Last Movie You've Seen!
  • But with Pulp fiction you can't go wrong.
  • Ed Wood (Tim Burton, 1994) ****
    The relationship between Ed Wood (Johnny Depp) and Bela Lugosi (Martin Landau) is very well-done in this film. The performances are universally great, with Landau standing out (he's well-deserving of his Oscar), and I really like the use of black-and-white.

    Kiss Kiss, Bang Bang (Shane Black, 2005) ****
    What a gem this movie is. It's a classic mystery flick that also serves as a tongue-in-cheek comedy. The dialogue is dry and witty, and Robert Downey Jr. and Val Kilmer have great chemistry. I also really like how self-aware the movie is, with constant fourth wall-breaking references.

    Manhattan (Woody Allen, 1979) ***½
    This romcom is very smart and very charming. Like Ed Wood, the black-and-white suits it nicely. It's not laugh-out-loud comedy, but you can really admire how clever it is.

    When in Rome (Mark Steven Johnson, 2010) **
    I didn't hate it as much as most critics, but it is an incredibly mediocre and generic romcom. There are few chuckles to be had, and while Kristen Bell brings a charm to her role (I only watched it because I think she's gorgeous), Josh Duhamel has the acting range of cardboard.

    First Blood (Ted Kotcheff, 1982) ***
    Stallone is a total badass in this film. I really like the segments where he stalks his foes like prey, and although I don't like the ending, Stallone shows that he has acting chops during the climax of the film. It's not much more than a fun action flick, but it does have good performances, good pacing, and well-choreographed action, which keeps it from falling into the depths of generic action.

    The Hot Chick (Tom Brady, 2002) *½
    The humor is great if you're a four-year-old, but, for the most part, this film is devoid of any intelligence. If you wanna see a man explore the possibilities of having a penis or prancing around in tight clothes acting effeminate, by all means, watch this movie.
  • Rise of the Planet of the Apes: 8/10

    I have to admit my expectations walking into this were low. A prequel to a classic, with the original being remade - which blew. Brilliant acting by Andy Serkis as Caesar. He has a real knack for performance capture, and nailed the mannerisms of a chimpanzee. James Franco's character was almost a side role, but does a solid job, as usual. Unsure about the Caroline character. Seemed a pointless inclusion, with no real back story to how Franco's character knew her, and to be honest the role of the character in the film, except to attend Caesar's wound.

    This line between what Caesar should be seen as, and what he sees himself as - visually a chimpanzee, but behaviours of a human due to its increased intelligence is explored very well. You grow attached to the character as the movie progresses; and not just because he's a cute chimpanzee, but because he has human traits.


    The Inbetweeners Movie: 5/10

    I was only introduced to the TV series recently, so I came to the movie with the three series of the TV show fresh in my mind. The Inbetweeners has always been a bit hit and miss for me really, and the movie was along the same lines, with the predictable happy ending of all four of the main characters finding love, which is fine, as the plot is hardly the focus. It's essentially a British version of American Pie - Four dudes trying to get laid. It was funny in places, and provides memorable lines, but nothing else. It achieves what it set out to do.
  • Ocean's Eleven (Steven Soderbergh, 2001) ***½
    I love me a good heist film. Seeing a heist come together and get successfully pulled off is so cool. The film is very smart and the twists and turns in the heist are really cool to watch.

    Platoon (Oliver Stone, 1986) ***½
    This movie is dark, gritty, and realistic. It's a great film, albeit cheesy at times. The acting is fantastic, and the atmosphere is so great. The film really captures the horrors of war in an incredibly well-done fashion.

    Saw (James Wan, 2004) **
    The movie is average at best. I like the concept (although the sequels really overdid it), and it was cool to see the psychological torment the characters were going through, but the whole backstory for Jigsaw was told in the most asinine way. The film has a nice little twist at the end, although once you think about it for more than five seconds, you realize how implausible it is and you wonder how the characters didn't see it coming from the beginning of the film.

    The Hurt Locker (Kathryn Bigelow, 2009) ****
    Much like Platoon, The Hurt Locker is dark, gritty, and realistic. Unlike Platoon, there's not a cheesy moment in this film. It's one of the best war films ever made (the best since Apocalypse Now in 1979), and it does a fantastic job of bringing to life the quote at the beginning, which explains how war can act as a drug. It's truly a remarkable film.

    It's Kind of a Funny Story (Anna Boden/Ryan Fleck, 2010) ***
    This film really hit home for me. It's got witty humor, well-played drama, and solid performances. I'm impressed at how well Zach Galifianakis was able to balance comedy with drama. He's actually a talented actor when it comes down to it, and Emma Roberts shows that she truly is of the Roberts bloodline. She's got talent as well, and I really wish she would do movies other than crap like Nancy Drew and Hotel for Dogs. I've never seen Keir Gilchrist before, but he also did a solid job.

    Edge of Darkness (Martin Campbell, 2010) **½
    Mel Gibson gives a solid performance in this crime-thriller, but the film gets lost and ultimately loses quality as a result. The father-daughter relationship isn't well-developed, making the emotional impact of his daughter's murder minimal. The film soon delves into conspiracies, which I didn't like, and for a thriller, it's quite tame and there are few thrills.
  • Dang, TRF, you must watch nothing but movies from morning til night.
  • Brisby said:
    Dang, TRF, you must watch nothing but movies from morning til night.


    I think he has an internal Blu-Ray player.

    @TRF

    If you're really into movies usually television shows go along with that. Keir Gilchrist played a gay son in The United States of Tara, really interesting show Toni Collette does a fantastic job leading the cast.
  • The Disappearance of Haruhi Suzumiya: 7/10

    This one surprised me. It started really rough, and it had a bad habit of over explaining things that didn't need to be and under explaining things that did, but it had a level of emotional maturity the TV show never, ever came close to, and it managed to go for almost 3 hours without feeling stretched or long. Enjoyable.

    Perfect Blue: 7/10

    I had seen this movie several years ago, and remain of the same opinion. It has it's problems (weird cuts and all), but it's a genuinely exciting thriller with a bit of a mean, perverted, and violent streak that makes it eerily compelling.

    The Borrower's Arriety: 8/10

    Fun movie! Not quite Ghibli top-tier, but another wonderfully animated movie with a great cast of characters and an antagonist that made me want to explode.
  • Perfect Blue: 3/5

    Super, super weird movie with some of the most creepy character designs I've seen in a while, it has its issues but it is an exciting pyschological thriller that will make you feel uncomfortable as hell and keeps you guessing until the very last moment!

    The Disapperance of Haruhi Suzumiya: 4/5

    I can't really say anything GoodEnough hasn't already said! super enjoyable movie that was a pleasant surprise considering the bad TV show.
  • Brisby said:
    Dang, TRF, you must watch nothing but movies from morning til night.

    I've been doing that for the whole of August. Don't worry, I often have friends over to watch them with me. ;)
  • The Color of Money (Martin Scorsese, 1986) ***½
    While the story isn't particularly unique, it is nice to see it applied to an often overlooked sport: pool. Paul Newman gives a fantastic performance and Tom Cruise isn't so bad either. I thought the plot got a little lost towards the end but I still really enjoyed it.

    The Town (Ben Affleck, 2010) ****
    The Town is raw and gritty. Jeremy Renner is great in his supporting role. Ben Affleck, Jon Hamm, Rebecca Hall, and Pete Postlethwaite all do fine work as well. Affleck and Hall have a great chemistry. The action sequences are exhilarating and the dialogue is perfect. The Town is Oscar material that was criminally overlooked.

    The Kids Are All Right (Lisa Cholodenko, 2010) ***½
    The performances are great, and it's a crime that Julianne Moore was overlooked by the Academy. The script is smart and funny, and the plot is unique and unconventional. There's also plenty of drama thrown into the mix, which is also done well.

    The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (Sergio Leone, 1966) ****
    This is one of the best Western flicks I've ever seen, if not THE best. Clint Eastwood does great work as the iconic Man With No Name, whose badassery knows no bounds. The score is epic, and although it's repetitive, it doesn't get old. I love how the three characters' stories converge. The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly both serves as a phenomenal Western and an exceptional epic. My only real complaint is that most of the dialogue is poorly dubbed, and I mean REALLY poorly dubbed.
  • Brüno (Larry Charles, 2009) ***
    The film is okay, but nowhere near as funny as Borat. Borat was funny because of the way his culture clashed with American culture, and it was funny to see how Americans reacted to his behavior, which he felt was normal. Unfortunately, the filmmakers didn't understand what made Borat funny and figured that people liked it because of penis jokes. Hence, Brüno is filled with penis from start to finish. Frankly, it was disgusting to watch. Now I have no problem with seeing a penis in a film. I'm comfortable enough with my sexuality to be able to see it and not make a big deal about it. However, when a scene shows a penis swinging around for thirty seconds a la Meatspin followed by the urethral hole talking and moving like a mouth, then it's gone too far. The movie is disgusting, plain and simple. There are a couple of scenes that had me rolling, but most of the jokes are awkward, and Brüno lacks the focus that Borat had. While Borat was a clever commentary on the way we as Americans see foreigners, Brüno was simply a gay man doing gratuitous gay things. It's not a terrible comedy, but it could have been so much more considering how great its spiritual predecessor was.

    How to Train Your Dragon (Chris Sanders/Dean DeBlois, 2010) ***
    The relationship between the boy and the dragon is great, and feels very genuine. It's a classic boy meets animal story, but set in a great universe. I like how there are many dragon types instead of just one, each with their own abilities. The dragons are very creatively designed, in both physical appearance and characteristics. My favorite is either Toothless or the two-headed one that shoots flammable gas and sparks. The voice acting is pretty solid, although Jay Baruchel's voice doesn't really fit the character very well (not saying he was bad, I just think he has the wrong voice for the part). The movie isn't laugh-out-loud funny, but it's good enough for a chuckle, and the action is really cool. The animation wasn't Pixar-quality and definitely wasn't Rango-quality (which I think has the best animation of any CGI animated film out there), but it wasn't half-bad either. It's not as clever and funny as Tangled nor does it have the heart of Toy Story 3, but it's a solid animated film that both kids and adults alike can enjoy.

    Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, 1976) ****
    To start, I'll just point out that Taxi Driver is my all-time favorite film. Travis Bickle is one of the most complex and fascinating characters in cinema history. He's well-acted by the amazing Robert De Niro, and well-fleshed out, and it's really interesting to see his transformation into an antihero. Although it takes place in New York City, much of Travis's transformation can be attributed to his time in Vietnam, which helped shape his character throughout the film. The supporting Jodie Foster, Peter Boyle, and Harvey Keitel does excellent work as well. Taxi Driver works on many levels and can be interpreted in many ways, and for that, it's an incredibly work of art.

    To Kill a Mockingbird (Robert Mulligan, 1962) ****
    This film is a great adaptation of my favorite book, which is an excellent insight into many important issues such as the legitimacy of the justice system and racial relations. What makes it so great is that these issues are examined through the eyes of the young Scout Finch, who has a very simplistic and innocent view on these issues. By looking through the eyes of this innocent youth, we see the issues in a more objective manner. The dialogue is brilliant and Gregory Peck gives an amazing performance as Atticus Finch, one of the most iconic protagonists in movie history. It's also the feature film debut of Robert Duvall, who is currently one of my favorite actors. It's just an incredible film all-around.

    Fantastic Mr. Fox (Wes Anderson, 2009) *[B]*[/B]
    I was shocked to see how well this film was received. It's an incredibly simple and medicore children's film that only a very small child could enjoy. The voice acting is adequate. It's nothing amazing but it's not bad either. I give the film props for having a unique animation style, and it works for the sets, but the character models don't show any kind of emotion unless the camera angle is close to their face. The plot is simple and occasionally loses focus, and the dialogue is incredibly basic aside from a handful of clever lines (they're not really that funny, just clever). It's not a terrible film, it just doesn't feel special or unique at all aside from the claymation. A really young child might enjoy it, but I don't think children over the age of ten will like it. It's harmless entertainment for the kids but makes no attempt to do anything beyond that.
  • Grown Ups (Dennis Dugan, 2010) *
    I didn't laugh once in this film. Not once. Most good comedies have their actors play their roles straight, but in Grown Ups, the lead actors laugh for us, which is the only time any laughing is done. They crack bad jokes, get hit by stuff, fall into things, and there's the occasional fart joke as well. The plot is paper thin and the last act of the film comes out of nowhere, probably as a way to end what is ultimately a film without purpose or story. It's almost as if Sandler got a bunch of his friends together to get drunk and spend time at a lake house while filming it so he could make a quick buck.

    The Other Guys (Adam McKay, 2010) **
    The script is solid and the supporting cast isn't half-bad. The real problem lies in the lead roles. Will Ferrell is simply doing his regular shtick, and frankly, it's getting tiresome. Mark Wahlberg is just plain boring. I really liked Samuel L. Jackson and Dwayne Johnson in this movie and I wish they had a bigger part in the film. It's one of the weaker Ferrell/McKay collaborations and a mediocre film overall.

    To Wong Foo, Thanks For Everything! Julie Newmar (Beeban Kidron, 1995) **½
    It's cool to see Patrick Swayze and Wesley Snipes step out of their comfort zone for this kind of movie (supposedly John Leguizamo is used to this kind of role), and all three lead performances are great. I have a feeling the movie is directed more at a female audience, but I still thought it was okay. It's entertaining in some parts and stupid in others, and the plot isn't all that unique, but for what it is it wasn't half-bad.

    MacGruber (Jorma Taccone, 2010) ***
    It's a stupid movie, but it's very funny. Will Forte and Kristen Wiig are both hilarious, especially together. Val Kilmer is great as the villain Dieter Von Cunth. The jokes come nonstop a la Airplane! and don't relent. It's dumb, it's crude, it's vulgar, but if you can turn your brain off then you're in for a great time.

    The Pianist (Roman Polanski, 2002) ****
    This is one of the best films of its decade. Adrien Brody gives his best performance to date. It's powerful, suspenseful, moving, and emotional, and it does a great job of showing both the benevolent and hate-filled sides of humanity. The music is also great.

    (500) Days of Summer (Marc Webb, 2009) ***½
    Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Zooey Deschanel are both great and incredibly charming in this movie and have a wonderful chemistry. The script is clever, witty, charming, sweet, and spontaneous, and some of the scenes are handled really well as far as cinematography goes. I like the nonlinear plot structure. The film skips around within the five hundred days as a way of showing how Gordon-Levitt's character himself recalls the relationship: starting with the good times and filling in later with the bad times. It's a great method of storytelling that works well with this particular film. (500) Days of Summer is a refreshingly smart and sincere film in a world full of shallow romantic comedies.

    Scary Movie (Keenan Ivory Wayans, 2000) **½
    While I did laugh at a couple of scenes, most of the movie consists of jokes forced down your throat, only a few of which are funny (and when they're not funny, they're usually cringe-inducing). The film spoofs other, better films that aren't even in the horror genre, like The Matrix and The Usual Suspects. Anna Faris doesn't have her usual charm. What these current parody filmmakers don't understand is that a joke should make sense in the context of the film. Having Anna Faris do a flying kick to Scream a la The Matrix followed by a mid-air jig is completely out-of-place and is instead a joke crammed into the film. It's not clever, it's repetitive, it's "been there, done that," it's not subtle, it sacrifices plot for out-of-place jokes, and above all else, IT'S NOT FUCKING FUNNY (most of the time, at least).

    The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (Peter Jackson, 2001) ****
    Need I explain myself? It's The Lord of the Rings. It's well-acted, well-directed, well-written, well-paced, and well-shot. It's a journey of the most epic proportions, and the atmosphere is full of both charm and terror, changing when it needs to. The film features a variety of locales and the battles are grand. The entire trilogy is among the best in fantasy films, and I can't wait for The Hobbit: An Unexpected Journey and The Hobbit: There and Back Again.

    Easy A (Will Gluck, 2010) ***
    I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this one. Emma Stone is great in this, and her character is very witty and likeable. The dialogue is a nice blend of teenage diction and great wit. The drama is also really well-done and I was very sympathetic for Emma Stone's character. Easy A is a lot smarter than I was expecting, and I really liked it.
  • TRF said:

    Fantastic Mr. Fox (Wes Anderson, 2009) C-
    I was shocked to see how well this film was received. It's an incredibly simple and medicore children's film that only a very small child could enjoy. The voice acting is adequate. It's nothing amazing but it's not bad either. I give the film props for having a unique animation style, and it works for the sets, but the character models don't show any kind of emotion unless the camera angle is close to their face. The plot is simple and occasionally loses focus, and the dialogue is incredibly basic aside from a handful of clever lines (they're not really that funny, just clever). It's not a terrible film, it just doesn't feel special or unique at all aside from the claymation. A really young child might enjoy it, but I don't think children over the age of ten will like it. It's harmless entertainment for the kids but makes no attempt to do anything beyond that.


    You know, I actually liked this movie and was pleasantly surprised by it since the trailers made it look pretty lame. I thought the humor was more sophisticated than what a kid under ten would understand. It's definitely an adult/teen movie plus, I don't think young kids would find the graphics (stop motion) very interesting. They like their bright, vivid CG colors. Anyway, I thought it was cleverly made and charming film, but it did have a tendency to drag on and some of the voice acting is just 'meh.'
  • Hobo with a shotgun.......A+++++++++++++++++++++++

    Loved everything about it, the look, the action, the acting, the lighting, the sets, the music oh my i loved everything about it <3
  • TRF said:
    Taxi Driver (Martin Scorsese, 1976) A+
    To start, I'll just point out that Taxi Driver is my all-time favorite film. Travis Bickle is one of the most complex and fascinating characters in cinema history. He's well-acted by the amazing Robert De Niro, and well-fleshed out, and it's really interesting to see his transformation into an antihero. Although it takes place in New York City, much of Travis's transformation can be attributed to his time in Vietnam, which helped shape his character throughout the film. The supporting Jodie Foster, Peter Boyle, and Harvey Keitel does excellent work as well. Taxi Driver works on many levels and can be interpreted in many ways, and for that, it's an incredibly work of art.


    I agree 100%. Taxi driver is my favourite film as well, however sadly very few people actually saw or know this movie.
  • Easy A (Will Gluck, 2010) B+
    I was surprised at how much I enjoyed this one. Emma Stone is great in this, and her character is very witty and likeable. The dialogue is a nice blend of teenage diction and great wit. The drama is also really well-done and I was very sympathetic for Emma Stone's character. Easy A is a lot smarter than I was expecting, and I really liked it.


    Personally, I'd give it higher than a B+, but that's just me. In a world of shallow teenage comedies in which writers and directors show they have zero understanding of young people what_so_ever, this movie made me very happy. Pulling from 80's teenage comedies and The Scarlett letter, this film manages to pull of an excellent homage and a message that all people can understand, and all teenagers will truly sympathize with. Still, despite the script being so wonderfully written, I truly feel that without Emma Stone, things would have not gone as well with this movie. She continues to prove to be comedic genius, having great timeing, and being very well spoken. She also manages to be emotional, making the viewers care, and showing that she's one of the better actresses out there today. This was one of my favorite films of 2010, up there with "Inception" (A+), "Toy Story 3"(A+), and "Scott Pilgrim vs The World."(A)

    (500) Days of Summer (Marc Webb, 2009) A
    Joseph Gordon-Levitt and Zooey Deschanel are both great and incredibly charming in this movie and have a wonderful chemistry. The script is clever, witty, charming, sweet, and spontaneous, and some of the scenes are handled really well as far as cinematography goes. I like the nonlinear plot structure. The film skips around within the five hundred days as a way of showing how Gordon-Levitt's character himself recalls the relationship: starting with the good times and filling in later with the bad times. It's a great method of storytelling that works well with this particular film. (500) Days of Summer is a refreshingly smart and sincere film in a world full of shallow romantic comedies.


    Completely agree on this one. Definately one of the better films of 2009, and of all the fims of 2009, this has come to be my favorite (with UP and Inglorious Bastards close behind). It really captures what happens in relationships. Too often, even in the best films, we get a story of two individuals coming together and living happily ever after, but not here. This is, as the films states, is not a love story, but a story of two individuals being part of each others lives for 500 days. It's rational, which is something so many other films that deal with love and relationships fail to be, and that's what makes it work so well. Also it's one of few movies that I can have a completely different reaction to depending on my emotional state. If I'm depressed, I end up hating Summer. If I'm feeling fine, I'm sympathetic towards Tom, but realize that Summer did nothing wrong. Truly a wonderful film.

    American Psycho (A+): The only real flaw I find with this film is that the writers fucked up and gave a date to an album wrong. Other than that, it's one of the darkest, and funniest films I have ever seen. Christian Bale gives an incredibly entertaining performance, one that very few actors could do. He manages to go from incredibly subdued to completely over the top in seconds, and makes it work. Under all the crazy and dark humor this film offers is a message, a look at humanity. It shows the evils of conformity, and how weak humans can be when it comes to wanting to be successful and fitting in. What I love the most is that it manages to do this without saying that wanting to be successful is bad, and never attacks the corporations that created Yuppies. It simply gives the most entertaining and extreme view of the bad things that come in trying to be "fit in" as Bateman says. It's thoughtful, funny, and frightening all at the same time. One of my favorite films of all time.
  • Vampires Suck (Jason Friedberg/Aaron Selzter, 2010) ½
    I hate this movie for pretty much the same reasons I hate all of these recent parody films. The jokes are forced in and hold no relevance to the film. They're just terrible movies.

    District 9 (Neill Blomkamp, 2009) ***½
    I really like how the film is initially presented as a documentary. I also think it's cool how the aliens are the oppressed ones instead of the other way around. The aliens look pretty cool and pretty life-like considering the budget. I really wanna see what else Blomkamp can do.

    Austin Powers in Goldmember (Jay Roach, 2002) ***
    This is how a parody should be done. It should parody the aspects of the films, not the scenes themselves. It should actually contain its own jokes, too. This is what the current parody filmmakers don't understand.

    Rampage (Uwe Boll, 2009) ½
    There's no plot, the dialogue is terrible, the camerawork and editing are awful, and the whole concept is just plain stupid. It's almost as if Boll filmed a guy doing what he did after just watching an Uwe Boll movie.
  • Rebuild of Evangelion 1.01 1/5.

    Uuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuugh.
  • Happy Gilmore (Dennis Dugan, 1996) ***
    This is one of the better Dugan-Sandler pairings. If you're a fan of Sandler's routine, then you'll enjoy it. If not, then you won't. I really like Sandler's over-the-top performances, and the rest of the supporting cast is great (I love Kevin Nealon in this movie; he has a great energy).

    Undercover Brother (Malcolm D. Lee, 2002) ***
    This is a really funny homage to the blaxploitation era of cinema in the 1970s. While it's not as loyal to the genre as Black Dynamite, it is a lot funnier.
  • Wall Street (Oliver Stone, 1987) ****
    One of my favorite movies. It's incredibly smart, but at the same time, accessible. There's a lot of economic broker jargon, but it's understandable for those of us who aren't knowledgeable in that area. The acting is great, especially by Michael Douglas as Gordon Gekko, one of my favorite movie villains.

    Casino (Martin Scorsese, 1995) ****
    The film reminds me a little too much of Goodfellas, but that's not really a bad thing. It's smart, it's classy, it's well-acted, well-directed, well-written, it's got all the staples of a great Scorsese flick.

    Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans (Werner Herzog, 2009) ***½
    I actually enjoy this more than the version with Harvey Keitel. Nic Cage goes over-the-top in this one, and it's so entertaining to watch his performance. I love when Nic Cage can be Nic Cage and just go all-out psycho.
  • Face/Off (John Woo, 1997) ***
    It's a nice action twist on the Freaky Friday story. Nic Cage and John Travolta both give solid performances, and the action isn't half-bad (I especially like the boat chase at the end). It's ridiculous, it's over-the-top, but it's also very fun.

    2 Fast 2 Furious
    (John Singleton, 2003) *½
    It's incredibly stupid, but unlike the other entries in the series, it doesn't have much good action. It's a very bland, very mediocre action film.

    Prince of Persia: The Sands of Time (Mike Newell, 2010) *½
    The plot is thin, the acting is lousy (Gyllenhaal sucks, Molina overplays his character, and Kingsley just doesn't seem interested at all), and the action is weak. The film does have nice production values, but that's really about it. It's not the worst video game adaptation I've seen, and it's really not terrible, but it's far from good.

    Knowing (Alex Proyas, 2009) **½
    Nic Cage does solid work, but it doesn't save the movie from being anything more than average. The premise is cool, but the rest of the flick doesn't follow suit. It's not a movie you can really take seriously, but it's still mildly entertaining. The plot makes no sense and the twists and turns are absolutely ridiculous, a la M. Night Shyamalan. You'll be scratching your head throughout the end credits because nothing is really explained, leaving you with a ton of questions. The effects are mediocre but kinda cool in a campy sort of way, and the set pieces can be exciting at points (the train scene comes to mind). Ultimately, it's not a film that will give you thrills or chills, but rather a laugh here and there, and for that, it's better than the reception it received.

    Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps (Oliver Stone, 2010) ***
    It's not nearly as good as the original, but it's still a pretty good followup. Josh Brolin does solid work, and Michael Douglas is great in his return to his most famous role. Shia LaBeouf isn't a very good actor and was severely miscast in this film. Much like its 1987 predecessor, it's very smart while also being accessible. The last act of the film is a bit formulaic and the story is a bit predictable (since you pretty much know right off the bat that Gordon Gekko is a bad guy, you can see plot points coming a mile away, as opposed to the first film, where you see his true nature unfold over the course of the film), but it's still a solid film that makes good on current events.

    Salt (Phillip Noyce, 2010) ***
    This is a pretty generic action flick, but it's still a mild amount of fun. Think Jason Bourne with tits. There are some cool plot twists thrown into the mix, but some of them are implausible. The film does do a good job of keeping the audience guessing the motivations of the protagonist, Evelyn Salt. Angelina Jolie isn't particularly great in this, but she's not too bad either. Liev Schreiber gives the best performance in the film as Salt's boss. I was surprised at how much better this film was than my expectations.

    Scott Pilgrim vs. the World (Edgar Wright, 2010) ****
    This is a very unique film. It's got a really cool style, combining comic book and video game graphics that any nerd is sure to love (such as enemies exploding into coins and visual onomatopoeia). I'm not a fan of Michael Cera, but he's actually bearable in this one. The movie is also very funny, given that it's an Edgar Wright film, and Kieran Culkin is very funny as Scott's gay roommate.

    Braveheart (Mel Gibson, 1995) ***
    This movie is just plain epic. The action is great, the acting is great, and the movie just has this grand scale to it. It's just great.

    Jennifer's Body (Karyn Kusama, 2009) ***
    I think this film was poorly-reviewed because it was looked at as a straight horror flick. It's really more of a dark comedy and it does the comedy very well. It's a campy, sexy flick that focuses solely on Megan Fox's figure and terrible teen dialogue, and the film isn't even afraid to admit it. I can really appreciate a movie that knows what it wants to do and does it, and Jennifer's Body does it well.
  • Jason X (James Isaac, 2002) *
    This movie is unintentionally entertaining but horrible for what it is. The premise itself is stupid, the movie isn't scary, the acting is awful, the dialogue is terrible, and the violence is hilariously ridiculous (my favorite scene is when Jason punches a chick's head off). There are some really fucking stupid scenes, like when they trap Jason in a virtual recreation of Camp Crystal Lake and trick him into killing two topless hologram girls so they can escape in the meantime. I don't know why anyone thought this would be scary.

    The Sorcerer's Apprentice (Jon Turtletaub, 2010) *½
    The effects are cool, but the script is pretty lousy, relying on terribly unfunny jokes and basic dialogue. It's obvious Nicholas Cage doesn't give a shit about this role, because his performance is phoned in. The same goes for Alfred Molina as the evil wizard Maxim Horvath (I should also mention that the names are fucking stupid). Like I said, the film sports nice visuals, but they're not used enough to make the film eye candy, and the script and acting aren't strong enough to make this film anything more than dull and uninspired. It's beyond me why Disney thought it would be a good idea to turn a vignette from Fantasia into a live-action, feature-length film.

    Ocean's Twelve (Steven Soderbergh, 2004) ***
    It's not nearly as good as Ocean's Eleven. The plot is overly complex and occasionally difficult to follow, and the twists and turns really make most of the plot pointless. I also didn't like the reliance on science fiction technology (they used a device that would make a hologram of the item they stole so it would look like it was never gone). I kind of liked how they used Tess to get close to the egg; it was pretty damn funny and very creative. Ultimately, it's not a great heist flick and it's held back by a myriad of problems with the plot, but the witty and funny script make it worth a watch.
  • @TRF Sometimes I seriously question your movie selecting method.
  • 30 minutes or less: B-
    Jesse Eisenberg does a fair job playing a pizza boy caught in some serious trouble in 30 Minutes or Less. Aziz Ansari does a pretty great job as his partner in crime, as well. I found myself chuckling at quite a bit of Danny McBride being Danny McBride, though he did (as usual) get a bit out of hand at times, which is my main complaint; the moments where this movie tries to make me laugh, but I don't, take away from the overall experience. That being said, I had my fair share of laughs and the movie should be commended for it. Thank you 30 Minutes or Less, for making me laugh for the first time since I've lost power.
  • Ocean's Thirteen (Steven Soderbergh, 2007) **½
    Much like its predecessor, the plot is very convoluted. The characters aren't really as fleshed-out in this one, and the heist is really complex and only gets more complex. There's so much going on, it's hard to really follow it all. Seeing the heist play itself out is cool, but the buildup (which encompasses most of the film) is confusing and boring.

    Ice Age (Chris Wedge/Carlos Saldanha, 2002) ***
    It's not a particularly memorable computer-animated film, but it's still fun. The animation is really good and I like the voice work by Ray Romano as the Manny the mammoth, John Leguizamo as Sid the sloth, and Dennis Leary as Diego the saber-toothed cat. The squirrel Scrat is also very funny in his little aside scenes.

    9 (Shane Acker, 2009) **
    I was really excited for this film and I saw it the day it came out (the first day of my freshman year of high school, actually), and boy was I disappointed. The 2005 short film by Shane Acker was really cool (the feature-length film is based on it). The animation in the short film was fantastic and the film was suspenseful. The feature-length film introduced voice acting, most of which was average at best, and the plot was almost nonexistent. The animation was great, though, as was the atmosphere, and the creature designs exuded creativity. However, that didn't save the film from being a mediocre, story-free romp around an overused post-apocalyptic setting.

    Get Him to the Greek (Nicholas Stoller, 2010) ***½
    This was easily the funniest movie of 2010. Russell Brand is hilarious in this one, and Sean Combs also delivers the laughs. I enjoyed every single character, and the laughs come frequently. I especially love the Las Vegas segment on the film. The only downside comes in the form of one of the later scenes involving an awkward threesome. The scene itself is also very awkward and kind of uncomfortable to watch, as well as completely unnecessary. Other than that, it's a very funny movie that I can enjoy even on the fifth viewing (which this was).

    Dyer Makn said:
    @TRF Sometimes I seriously question your movie selecting method.

    Nothing wrong with throwing darts at a bulletin board full of movie titles. It's how Nicholas Cage picks his movie roles.

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